Posts Tagged ‘wired’

Related News: New Facebook Rules Show How Hard It Is to Police 1.4B Users

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Wired published an article titled New Facebook Rules Show How Hard It Is to Police 1.4B Users.

Once upon a time, governing the Facebook community was relatively simple, because users—mostly American college students—shared at least some cultural context for what was and wasn’t acceptable. But now Facebook’s 1.39 billion users span a range of ages, ethnicities, religions, gender identities, and nationalities, and Facebook’s ability to create a space that meets everyone’s definition of “safe” increasingly has been called into question.

Which is why today, Facebook updated its community guidelines, spelling out in unprecedented detail what constitutes unacceptable behavior. Yet the unwieldy specificity of the new guidelines only proves that Facebook’s policies and procedures surrounding user activity will never be a finished product. As the world’s largest social network, Facebook certainly can learn a lot from the past, but it can never fully anticipate the future.

Source: Wired

Related News: Nude-Photo Hackers Are Sad Apple Ruined Their Fun

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Wired published an article titled Nude-Photo Hackers Are Sad Apple Ruined Their Fun.

Late last week, Anon-IB, the anonymous image board that served as one of the central forums for hackers stealing and sharing nude photos from iCloud, came back online after a prolonged “maintenance” outage. The thousands of archived posts in its “/stol/” section, devoted to discussion of how to crack iCloud and steal unwitting victims’ compromising selfies, have been deleted. Those posts have been replaced with new ones from frustrated hackers lamenting that their sext-stealing hobby isn’t what it used to be.

Source: Wired

Related News: The App I Used to Break Into My Neighbor’s Home

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Wired published an article titled The App I Used to Break Into My Neighbor’s Home.

In any of those cases, a skilled lock hacker could recreate the key from the photos alone, using increasingly accessible tools like 3D printers, milling machines, or laser cutters. One group of researchers created a project called Sneakey in 2009 that showed they could reproduce keys photographed from nearly 200 feet away and at an angle. In other words, simply leaving your keys hanging from your belt presents a security problem, not to mention letting someone get ahold of them.

That means apps like KeyMe and KeysDuplicated haven’t exactly created the requirement that our physical keys be kept as secret as our digital ones. But they have democratized the security threat: Now even a lockpicking noob like me can demonstrate the danger of letting keys leave their owner’s control.

Source: Wired

Related News: The App That Lets You Spy on Yourself and Sell Your Own Data

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Wired published an article titled The App That Lets You Spy on Yourself and Sell Your Own Data.

For Citizenme, the price you pay is much higher, and it’s trying to shift internet economics back in your direction. The long-term plan is to provide a way for you to sell your own online data directly to advertisers and others of your choosing. But it isn’t there just yet. In the meantime, it’s focused on helping you collect and analyze your social media data through a mobile app that connects to multiple social networks—giving you more insight into how things work today. “The very first step is raising awareness, helping people understand what’s being done with their data,” says Citizenme founder StJohn Deakins.

Deakins, who has experience building mobile technologies for emerging markets, got the idea for Citizenme a few years ago, after selling mobile video company Triple Media to the private equity firm NewNet in 2010. “The biggest issue I could see for the internet is our data and what happens to our data,” he says. He acknowledges that personal data is essential to the health of the net because it drives the advertising that funds things. But today’s invasive data collection policies have made people distrustful. Citizenme hopes to change that by making users more aware of this process and, ultimately, letting them decide how their data is used.

Source: Wired

Related News: How Google Map Hackers Can Destroy a Business at Will

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Wired published an article titled How Google Map Hackers Can Destroy a Business at Will.

Washington DC-area residents with a hankering for lion meat lost a valuable source of the (yes, legal) delicacy last year when a restaurant called the Serbian Crown closed its doors after nearly 40 years in the same location. The northern Virginia eatery served French and Russian cuisine in a richly appointed dining room thick with old world charm. It was best known for its selection of exotic meats—one of the few places in the U.S. where an adventurous diner could order up a plate of horse or kangaroo. “We used to have bear, but bear meat was abolished,” says proprietor Rene Bertagna. “You cannot import any more bear.”

But these days, Bertagna isn’t serving so much as a whisker. It began in early 2012, when he experienced a sudden 75 percent drop off in customers on the weekend, the time he normally did most of his business. The slump continued for months, for no apparent reason. Bertagna’s profits plummeted, he was forced to lay off some of his staff, and he struggled to understand what was happening. Only later did Bertagna come to suspect that he was the victim of a gaping vulnerability that made his Google listings open to manipulation.

He was alerted to that possibility when one of his regulars phoned the restaurant. “A customer called me and said, ‘Why are you closed on Saturday, Sunday and Monday? What’s going on?’” Bertagna says.

It turned out that Google Places, the search giant’s vast business directory, was misreporting the Serbian Crown’s hours. Anyone Googling Serbian Crown, or plugging it into Google Maps, was told incorrectly that the restaurant was closed on the weekends, Bertagna says. For a destination restaurant with no walk-in traffic, that was a fatal problem.

Source: Wired

Related News: If You Used This Secure Webmail Site, the FBI Has Your Inbox

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Wired published an article titled If You Used This Secure Webmail Site, the FBI Has Your Inbox.

While investigating a hosting company known for sheltering child porn last year the FBI incidentally seized the entire e-mail database of a popular anonymous webmail service called TorMail.

Now the FBI is tapping that vast trove of e-mail in unrelated investigations.

The bureau’s data windfall, seized from a company called Freedom Hosting, surfaced in court papers last week when prosecutors indicted a Florida man for allegedly selling counterfeit credit cards online. The filings show the FBI built its case in part by executing a search warrant on a Gmail account used by the counterfeiters, where they found that orders for forged cards were being sent to a TorMail e-mail account: “platplus@tormail.net.”

Source: Wired