Related News: Facebook threats case heard at Supreme Court

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNN published an article titled Facebook threats case heard at Supreme Court.

The U.S. Supreme Court considered Monday where to draw the line in protecting free speech on social media sites like Facebook.

The Court heard arguments in the case of a Pennsylvania man convicted of making threatening statements about his estranged wife and law enforcement officials.

Anthony Elonis claims he did not intend to frighten anyone, that instead his writings were “therapeutic” and helped him deal with the sadness of his broken marriage.

Source: CNN

Related News: Supreme Court: Warrant needed for phone search

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. The Andalusia Star News published an article titled Supreme Court: Warrant needed for phone search.

The debate over whether or not police should be allowed to search the cell phones of people they arrest without first obtaining a warrant came to a close Wednesday when the United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of privacy.

In the unanimous decision, the Supreme Court ruled police must indeed obtain warrants before searching the digital content of phones taken from suspects placed under arrest. The decision comes after the court heard two cases in which a suspect’s phone was searched, and delivered one ruling for both. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said the ruling is significant because of the sheer number of cell phones in use today.

“These cases require us to decide how the search incident to arrest doctrine applies to modern cell phones, which are now such a pervasive and insistent part of daily life that the proverbial visitor from Mars might conclude they were an important feature of human anatomy,” Roberts wrote.

Source: Andalusia Star News

Related News: Online child porn victims lose at Supreme Court

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Ars Technica published an article titled Online child porn victims lose at Supreme Court.

A deeply divided Supreme Court set limits Wednesday to how much monetary compensation child victims of online pornography may reap from those who viewed their images.

The 5-4 decision set aside a $3.4 million judgement awarded to a woman whose pictures of her being raped as a child were widely circulated online.

The court ruled that Doyle Randall Paroline, a Texas man who was prosecuted in the case, does not have to pay that large sum, which is the total amount of damages the victim’s lawyers say she deserved.

Source: Ars Technica