How to keep your online data protected

Greg Price recently submitted an article to the Troy Messenger, How to keep your online data protected, to share important safety information during National Cyber Security Awareness Month:

Statistically, most cyber security issues originate from end-user activity. In fact, nearly seventy-five percent of all reviewed security breaches began as the result of end-user action.

The statistics do not surprise most security practitioners. After all, currently, end-users are the dominant consumer of electronic resources – people deploy, configure and use the devices. The machines aren’t running everything, yet.

We end-users make mistakes. Those statistics include IT professionals and everyday users. Often IT professionals lack adequate skills and training. Perhaps they exhibited some talent or aptitude and became the “go-to computer person”. Clever use of modern technology is no substitute for proper training. Nearly one-third of all security breaches were the result of poor IT configuration and management, according to an annual IBM cyber security study. Have confidence in your IT resources. If a search engine is your technician’s preferred tool, perhaps looking elsewhere is appropriate.

Related News: Wearable users tracked with Raspberry Pi

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. BBC News published an article titled Wearable users tracked with Raspberry Pi.

The work, carried out by security firm Symantec, used a Raspberry Pi computer to grab data broadcast by the gadgets.

The snooping Pi was taken to parks and sporting events where it was able to pick out individuals in the crowds.

Symantec said makers of wearables need to do a better job of protecting privacy and handling data they gather.

Source: BBC News

Related News: Apple Downplays Reports Of Back Doors To iPhones; Security Expert Says Company Is Being Misleading

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Consumerist published an article titled Apple Downplays Reports Of Back Doors To iPhones; Security Expert Says Company Is Being Misleading.

Late last week, forensic scientist Jonathan Zdziarski announced at a conference that Apple iPhones have back doors, undocumented functions that could allow unauthorized users to wirelessly connect and swipe data from the devices. Apple has since responded with a statement intended to downplay the issue, but Zdziarski insists that the computer company is not being honest with consumers.

Following the conference presentation, in which Zdziarski implied that these loopholes could be used by the NSA or others to collect massive amounts of data from iPhone users, Apple released a statement saying that what he’s discovered is actually a diagnostic tool to send relevant info to Apple, and that these “diagnostic functions do not compromise user privacy and security.”

Source: Consumerist

Related News: Stalker: A creepy look at you, online

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNN published an article titled Stalker: A creepy look at you, online.

While you were having a latte and hunting for a Tinder date on your local coffee shop’s open Wi-Fi, you were giving away your personal information.

Want to know how much? Stalker will tell you.

Stalker is a tool created by security firm Immunity Inc. to demonstrate the hazards of connecting to insecure public Wi-Fi networks.

Source: CNN

Related News: Facebook, Google users threatened by new security flaw

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Fox News published an article titled Facebook, Google users threatened by new security flaw.

A serious flaw in two widely used security standards could give anyone access to your account information at Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter and many other online services. The flaw, dubbed “Covert Redirect” by its discoverer, exists in two open-source session-authorization protocols, OAuth 2.0 and OpenID.

Both standards are employed across the Internet to let users log into websites using their credentials from other sites, such as by logging into a Web forum using a Facebook or Twitter username and password instead of creating a new account just for that forum.

Source: Fox News

Related News: Zuckerberg’s Facebook page hacked to prove security flaw

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNN published an article titled Zuckerberg’s Facebook page hacked to prove security flaw.

A Palestinian researcher posted a message on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s page last week after he says the site’s security team didn’t take his warnings about a security flaw seriously.

Source: CNN