Related News: Artist convinces people to sell their private data for a cookie

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Engadget published an article titled Artist convinces people to sell their private data for a cookie.

Talking to ProPublica, the artist revealed that people were happy to sign away their name, address, driver’s license number, phone number and their mother’s maiden name. As part of the deal, Puno also took pictures of each candidate, and in some cases asked for (and got) fingerprints and the last four digits of what people claimed was their social security number. If anyone asked what she planned to do with the information, the artist pointed to a terms and conditions sheet written in impossibly small text mirroring the sort we routinely ignore when we sign up to a new website.

Source: Engadget

Related News: California Assembly passes first student online privacy bill

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. SC Magazine published an article titled California Assembly passes first student online privacy bill.

California’s Assembly unanimously passed the nation’s first-ever K-12 student online privacy measure that would prohibit the use of students’ personal information for profit.

Source: SC Magazine

Related News: Stalker: A creepy look at you, online

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNN published an article titled Stalker: A creepy look at you, online.

While you were having a latte and hunting for a Tinder date on your local coffee shop’s open Wi-Fi, you were giving away your personal information.

Want to know how much? Stalker will tell you.

Stalker is a tool created by security firm Immunity Inc. to demonstrate the hazards of connecting to insecure public Wi-Fi networks.

Source: CNN

Related News: Johns Hopkins University web server breached; up to 1,300 affected

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. SC Magazine published an article titled Johns Hopkins University web server breached; up to 1,300 affected.

As many as 1,300 current and former Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering students’ personal information was posted online by an attacker claiming to be affiliated with hacktivist collective Anonymous.

After the university refused to give into extortion threats, the hacker dumped the data, including students’ names, email addresses and phone numbers, online, according to The Balitmore Sun.

Source: SC Magazine

Related News: Anger mounts after Facebook’s ‘shadow profiles’ leak in bug

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. ZDNet published an article titled Anger mounts after Facebook’s ‘shadow profiles’ leak in bug.

The personal information leaked by the bug is information that had not been given to Facebook by the users – it is data Facebook has been compiling on its users behind closed doors, without their consent.

A growing number of Facebook users are furious and demand to know who saw private information they had expressly not given to Facebook.

Facebook was accidentally combining user’s shadow profiles with their Facebook profiles and spitting the merged information out in one big clump to people they ‘had some connection to’ who downloaded an archive of their account with Facebook’s Download Your Information (DYI) tool.

Source: ZDNet

Related News: Celebrity credit reports posted by ID thieves taken from free website

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Ars Technica published an article titled Celebrity credit reports posted by ID thieves taken from free website.

Statements issued by the other two credit agencies, TransUnion and Experian, reported similar compromises. TransUnion said perpetrators used “considerable amounts of information about the victims, including Social Security numbers and other sensitive, personal identifying information that enabled them to successfully impersonate the victims over the Internet in order to illegally and fraudulently access their credit reports.” For its part, Experian said “criminals accessed personal credential information through various outside sources, which provided them with sufficient information to illegally access a limited number of individual reports from some US credit reporting agencies.” Neither agency said how many individuals were compromised or confirmed that they were the same celebrities and political figures whose details were aired on the exposed.su.

Source: Ars Technica

Related News: ‘Google for spies’ draws ire from rights groups

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. The Sydney Morning Herald published an article titled ‘Google for spies’ draws ire from rights groups.

The power of Riot to harness websites for surveillance offers a rare insight into techniques that have attracted interest from intelligence and national security agencies, at the same time prompting civil liberties and online privacy concerns.

Using Riot it is possible to gain a picture of a person’s life – their friends, the places they visit charted on a map – in little more than a few clicks of a button.

Source: Sydney Morning Herald