Related News: Apple Downplays Reports Of Back Doors To iPhones; Security Expert Says Company Is Being Misleading

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Consumerist published an article titled Apple Downplays Reports Of Back Doors To iPhones; Security Expert Says Company Is Being Misleading.

Late last week, forensic scientist Jonathan Zdziarski announced at a conference that Apple iPhones have back doors, undocumented functions that could allow unauthorized users to wirelessly connect and swipe data from the devices. Apple has since responded with a statement intended to downplay the issue, but Zdziarski insists that the computer company is not being honest with consumers.

Following the conference presentation, in which Zdziarski implied that these loopholes could be used by the NSA or others to collect massive amounts of data from iPhone users, Apple released a statement saying that what he’s discovered is actually a diagnostic tool to send relevant info to Apple, and that these “diagnostic functions do not compromise user privacy and security.”

Source: Consumerist

Related News: Facebook sued for allegedly making private messages into public “Likes”

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Ars Technica published an article titled Facebook sued for allegedly making private messages into public “Likes”.

Facebook is being sued by two users for intercepting the “content of the users’ communications,” including private messages, with the intent to “mine user data and profit from those data by sharing them with third parties—namely, advertisers, marketers, and other data aggregators.” The plaintiffs argue in a December 30 class action complaint that Facebook’s use of the word “private” in relation to its messaging system is misleading given the way the company treats the info contained within those messages.

Many of the allegations in this case are based on research done in 2012 by the Wall Street Journal for a series of articles about digital privacy. Facebook is far from the first company to use private messages to mint money. Gmail continues to be dinged for creating text ads based off of the content of e-mails ten years after the ads were first introduced. (And Gmail has been sued for that, too.)

Source: Ars Technica