Related News: Death threat hacker who fooled police is jailed

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. BBC News published an article titled Death threat hacker who fooled police is jailed.

A hacker who hijacked computers to make death threats has been jailed for eight years.

Yusuke Katayama played a game of cat and mouse with the authorities, leading them to make numerous wrongful arrests.

He threatened a massacre at a comic book event, as well as to attack a school attended by the grandchildren of Japan’s Emperor Akihito.

Katayama’s campaign highlighted the difficulties the country’s police force has had in dealing with cyber crime.

Source: BBC News

Related News: The App I Used to Break Into My Neighbor’s Home

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Wired published an article titled The App I Used to Break Into My Neighbor’s Home.

In any of those cases, a skilled lock hacker could recreate the key from the photos alone, using increasingly accessible tools like 3D printers, milling machines, or laser cutters. One group of researchers created a project called Sneakey in 2009 that showed they could reproduce keys photographed from nearly 200 feet away and at an angle. In other words, simply leaving your keys hanging from your belt presents a security problem, not to mention letting someone get ahold of them.

That means apps like KeyMe and KeysDuplicated haven’t exactly created the requirement that our physical keys be kept as secret as our digital ones. But they have democratized the security threat: Now even a lockpicking noob like me can demonstrate the danger of letting keys leave their owner’s control.

Source: Wired

Related News: Meet the men who spy on women through their webcams

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Ars Technica published an article titled Meet the men who spy on women through their webcams.

The woman is visible from thousands of miles away on a hacker’s computer. The hacker has infected her machine with a remote administration tool (RAT) that gives him access to the woman’s screen, to her webcam, to her files, to her microphone. He watches her and the baby through a small control window open on his Windows PC, then he decides to have a little fun. He enters a series of shock and pornographic websites and watches them appear on the woman’s computer.

The woman is startled. “Did it scare you?” she asks someone off camera. A young man steps into the webcam frame. “Yes,” he says. Both stare at the computer in horrified fascination. A picture of old naked men appears in their Web browser, then vanishes as a McAfee security product blocks a “dangerous site.”

“I think someone hacked into our computer,” says the young man.

Source: Ars Technica