Related News: Facial recognition app matches strangers to online profiles

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNET published an article titled Facial recognition app matches strangers to online profiles.

Soon your face could be your calling card. An upcoming app for Android, iOS, and Google Glass called NameTag will allow you to photograph strangers and find out who they are — complete with social networking and online dating profiles.

Spot someone out and about that you want to identify, and you can capture their face using your device’s camera. The app will send the photo wirelessly to NameTag’s server, where it will compare the photo to millions of online records and return with a name, more photos, and social-media profiles, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, where the person (or their friends) might have publicly posted photos of themselves.

Source: CNET

Related News: Unannounced use of license photos in criminal probes puts Ohio AG under fire

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNN published an article titled Unannounced use of license photos in criminal probes puts Ohio AG under fire.

Two months after a controversial facial recognition technology program was launched in Ohio without public notice, state Attorney General Mike DeWine conceded Monday he should have let Ohioans know that their images from driver’s licenses were being used by law enforcement in criminal investigations.

“If I had to do it over again, would we have announced it when we did it? Yeah, we would have. And I’ll take responsibility for that,” DeWine said at a news conference.

Although DeWine said he should have gone public with the program sooner, he gave no indication that the state would change or stop using the program. He did announce that an advisory board will be created to review the system’s usage and to suggest policy changes to avoid misuse of the program.

Source: CNN

Related News: Facebook agrees to delete European users’ facial recognition data

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. The Los Angeles Times published an article titled Facebook agrees to delete European users’ facial recognition data.

Facebook Inc. has agreed to delete all the facial recognition data it has collected from European users and switch off the feature in Europe by Oct. 15.

The move follows a review of the facial recognition feature that prompts users to “tag” friends in photos uploaded to the service.

Ireland’s privacy regulator Billy Hawkes said Facebook would not turn it back on without agreeing with his office on “the most appropriate means of collecting user consent.”  He said Facebook was “sending a clear signal of its wish to demonstrate its commitment to best practice in data protection compliance.”

Source: Los Angeles Times

Related News: Facebook acquires facial recognition startup, may broaden tagging ability

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Ars Technica published an article titled Facebook acquires facial recognition startup, may broaden tagging ability.

On Monday, Facebook announced that it would acquire Israeli startup Face.com for an undisclosed amount.

Face.com develops a mobile face recognition platform that can be used in various online and smartphone apps. The implications for how this could affect use on the world’s largest social network are huge—it may soon become even easier for mobile phone users to tag people, blurring the line between the physical and online worlds even further.

Source: Ars Technica