Related News: Facebook’s privacy policy breaks the law in Europe

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. BetaNews published an article titled Facebook’s privacy policy breaks the law in Europe.

There are many things that Facebook finds itself accused of on a regular basis. Unfairness to different groups, censorship of content, insensitivity, and endless problems surrounding its attitude to privacy and handling of user data. It seems that concerns about privacy were well-founded as a new report finds that the social network violated European law. Analysis carried out by the Belgian Privacy Commission and ICRI/CIR says that Facebook breaks the law in Europe in a number of ways. As well as placing too many expectations on users to be able to change settings for themselves.

Source: BetaNews

Related News: Europe’s top court supports ‘right to be forgotten’ in Google privacy case

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Publication Name published an article titled Europe’s top court supports ‘right to be forgotten’ in Google privacy case.

People have the “right to be forgotten” and search engines like Google must remove certain unwanted links, Europe’s top court decided in a surprise ruling Tuesday.

The case, which spotlighted the clash between privacy and freedom of information advocates, centered on a Spanish man’s efforts to remove historic links to his debt problems.

In its decision, the European Court of Justice found operators of search engines such as Google were the “controller” of information. They were therefore responsible for removing unwanted links if requested.

Source: CNN

Related News: Facebook agrees to delete European users’ facial recognition data

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. The Los Angeles Times published an article titled Facebook agrees to delete European users’ facial recognition data.

Facebook Inc. has agreed to delete all the facial recognition data it has collected from European users and switch off the feature in Europe by Oct. 15.

The move follows a review of the facial recognition feature that prompts users to “tag” friends in photos uploaded to the service.

Ireland’s privacy regulator Billy Hawkes said Facebook would not turn it back on without agreeing with his office on “the most appropriate means of collecting user consent.”  He said Facebook was “sending a clear signal of its wish to demonstrate its commitment to best practice in data protection compliance.”

Source: Los Angeles Times