Related News: Nude ‘Snapchat images’ put online by hackers

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. BBC News published an article titled Nude ‘Snapchat images’ put online by hackers.

Explicit images believed to have been sent through messaging service Snapchat were reportedly put online, with threats from hackers to upload more.

Users who had been accessing the service via a third-party app, and not the official Snapchat app, had their images intercepted.

As half of its users are aged between 13 and 17, there is concern that many of the images may be of children.

Source: BBC News

Related News: Anonymous email app launches with ‘creepy’ stunt

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNN published an article titled Anonymous email app launches with ‘creepy’ stunt.

The creators of an app that helps people send anonymous emails are coming under fire for a PR stunt that didn’t quite go as planned.

Over the last couple days, Leak, a new service that allows people to send anonymous emails, sent a number of reporters questionable emails as part of a push to promote the app.

An email sent via Leak to a Mashable reporter: “Dear neighbors, would you mind stop (sic) walking naked at home? We can see you every morning when having breakfast. From someone, anonymously. Sent from Leak.”

Source: CNN

Related News: Neighbors use smartphone app to fight crime

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. WSFA published an article titled Neighbors use smartphone app to fight crime.

A new kind of crime fighting tool is being used by neighborhoods in Montgomery and all over the country. It’s called ‘Nextdoor’, and it’s a private social network for neighbors.

As we have all heard before, the best way to keep your neighborhood safe is by connecting– knowing what should and shouldn’t be there as well as keeping each other alert. Now, that is as easy as opening an app on your phone.

Source: WSFA

Related News: The App That Lets You Spy on Yourself and Sell Your Own Data

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. Wired published an article titled The App That Lets You Spy on Yourself and Sell Your Own Data.

For Citizenme, the price you pay is much higher, and it’s trying to shift internet economics back in your direction. The long-term plan is to provide a way for you to sell your own online data directly to advertisers and others of your choosing. But it isn’t there just yet. In the meantime, it’s focused on helping you collect and analyze your social media data through a mobile app that connects to multiple social networks—giving you more insight into how things work today. “The very first step is raising awareness, helping people understand what’s being done with their data,” says Citizenme founder StJohn Deakins.

Deakins, who has experience building mobile technologies for emerging markets, got the idea for Citizenme a few years ago, after selling mobile video company Triple Media to the private equity firm NewNet in 2010. “The biggest issue I could see for the internet is our data and what happens to our data,” he says. He acknowledges that personal data is essential to the health of the net because it drives the advertising that funds things. But today’s invasive data collection policies have made people distrustful. Citizenme hopes to change that by making users more aware of this process and, ultimately, letting them decide how their data is used.

Source: Wired

Related News: Facial recognition app matches strangers to online profiles

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNET published an article titled Facial recognition app matches strangers to online profiles.

Soon your face could be your calling card. An upcoming app for Android, iOS, and Google Glass called NameTag will allow you to photograph strangers and find out who they are — complete with social networking and online dating profiles.

Spot someone out and about that you want to identify, and you can capture their face using your device’s camera. The app will send the photo wirelessly to NameTag’s server, where it will compare the photo to millions of online records and return with a name, more photos, and social-media profiles, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, where the person (or their friends) might have publicly posted photos of themselves.

Source: CNET

Related News: Does Twitter’s Vine have a porn problem?

One new article link has been added to our Related News page. CNN published an article titled Does Twitter’s Vine have a porn problem?

Perhaps it was a foregone conclusion, what with the Internet’s proven ability to turn any new technology into a platform for showing naked people.

But Twitter’s new video-sharing app, Vine, is under scrutiny after early adopters started using it to flash six-second porn clips to the app’s users and to the larger Twitter community.

It’s an issue that has Twitter scrambling to appease concerns. And it’s raising questions about how Apple, the only place where smartphone users can download the app, will respond after recently banning other apps that provide access to sexual content.

Source: CNN